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South Florida Central Labor Council

South Florida CLC

4349 NW 36th Street Suite. 107
Miami Springs Florida, 33166

 

 

Key Officers

Andy Madtes, President, UNITE HERE Local 355

South Florida AFL-CIO

4349 NW 36th St

Miami Springs, FL  33166

Cell: 786-213-3702

andy@thesfaflcio.org

 

 

Sustainability Profile

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Former president Fred Frost of the South Florida AFL-CIO was known as an outspoken leader on clean energy.  The Sierra Club described Fred Frost as “strong leader in the campaign for clean energy and renewables” referencing Frost’s speech at Clean Energy rally in Coconut Grove and partnership with the Sierra Club in a march in Miami to support fair trade. In 2009, Former President Frost spoke on the “Repower America” Town Hall panel. The event description read:

Are you concerned about our energy future? Homegrown jobs that can’t be outsourced? American energy independence? Sea level rise and other consequences of global climate change?

Join Environment Florida and a broad coalition of elected officials, labor leaders, “green” business, and your neighbors to talk with our representatives in Congress about how they will lead South Florida to:

  • Repower America with 100% clean electricity
  • Refuel America by cutting our oil dependence in half
  • Rebuild America by creating 5 million new jobs through investment in wind and solar energy, energy efficiency and public transportation
  • Reduce total U.S. global warming emissions by at least 80 percent by 2050

Frost’s successor, Andy Madtes, has not yet directly discussed issues related to the environment. However, during his presidency, the SF CLC endorsed Senator Bill Nelson, who the CLC quotes, “stopped oil companies from drilling in vital military training areas and off of Florida’s beaches, has been a tireless champion for restoring the Everglades and has helped revitalize the nation’s deep-space exploration program. Nelson also sponsored the law that directs fines collected from BP after the oil spill back to the Gulf Coast communities.”

Additionally, Andy Madtes is a member of the advisory committee to the Research institute on Social and Economic Policy. RISEP  “[provides] facts, figures, and information to labor unions, community organizing groups, and the media about things that impact the lives of working people: the economy, wages and benefits, housing cost, health care, immigration, and the environment are some issues [RISEP has] studied.”

An extensive search reveals little other labor council activity related to environmental protection in Miami. This absence of information is curious, as South Florida is one of the most vulnerable locations to climate change in the US. It is quite possible the union has been active but has not reported activity on its outdated and broken website. For example, the IBEW has hosted solar power installation training in Miami, but the opportunity was not publicly mentioned by the South Florida CLC despite the fact that some of its members may have attended. Alternately, Partnering for Change, an early 2000 study of coalition building within the labor movement reported that South Florida’s labor activists have been reported to be more active in their Jobs with Justice chapter rather than their CLC.  This trend may also account for the lack of environmental commentary from the CLC.

 

 

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